Downfall of ibo society in things

This issue is resolved by only one representative, the Oracle.

Downfall of ibo society in things

He has three wives and ten total children, and is a brave and rash Umuofia Nigerian warrior and clan leader. Unlike most, he cares more for his daughter Ezinma than his son Nwoye whom he believes is weak.

Okonkwo is the son of the gentle and lazy Unoka, a man he resents for his weaknesses. Okonkwo strives to make his way in a culture that traditionally values manliness.

He therefore rejects everything for which he believes his father stood: Unoka was idle, poor, profligate, cowardly, gentle, lazy, and interested in music and conversation. Okonkwo consciously adopts opposite ideals and becomes productive, wealthy, brave, violent, and opposed to music and anything else that he regards as "soft," such as conversation and emotion.

He is stoic to a fault. He is also the hardest-working member of his clan. Ironically, in all his efforts not to end up like his father, he commits suicide, becoming in his culture an abomination to the Earth and rebuked by the tribe as his father was Unoka died from swelling and was likewise considered an abomination.

Although she falls in love with Okonkwo after seeing him in a wrestling match, she marries another man because Okonkwo is too poor to pay her bride price at that time. She receives severe beatings from Okonkwo just like his other wives; but unlike them, she is known to talk back to Okonkwo.

She is the only one who has the audacity to knock on the door of his obi at dawn. Having met with the grave misfortunes of the deaths of her first nine children, she is a devoted mother to Ezinma, whom she protects and loves dearly.

When Chielo, a priestess of Agbala, the Oracle of the Hills and Caves, says that the oracle wishes to see Ezinma, Ekwefi follows the priestess through the dark woods and even makes up her mind to enter the cave where Agbala resides and to die with her daughter if need be.

Okonkwo looks for them and goes to the mouth of the cave himself after waiting for a certain period, because he too was very worried about Ezinma and Ekwefi even though he had kept this worry to himself.

Upon finding Ekwefi, he was very relieved and they both waited for Ezinma. He loved language and music, the flute in particular. He is lazy and miserly, neglecting to take care of his wives and children and even dies with unpaid debts.

Okonkwo spends his life trying not to become a failure like his father Unoka. Similar to Unoka, Nwoye does not subscribe to the traditional Igbo view of masculinity being equated to violence; rather, he prefers the stories of his mother. He is one of the early converts to Christianity and takes on the Christian name Isaac, an act which Okonkwo views as a final betrayal.

Ikemefuna is a boy from the Mbaino tribe. His father murders the wife of an Umuofia man, and in the resulting settlement of the matter, Ikemefuma is put into the care of Okonkwo.

By the decision of Umuofian authorities, Ikemefuna is ultimately killed, an act which Okonkwo does not prevent, and even participates in, lest he seem feminine and weak. Ezinma often contradicts and challenges her father, which wins his adoration, affection, and respect.

He is a strong and powerful man in Umuofia, but unlike Okonkwo, he is a reasoning man and is much less violent and arrogant. Obierika often talks Okonkwo out of making rash decisions, and helps Okonkwo when he is on exile from Umuofia.This page provides a map and general information about Nigeria, including descriptions of its four main ethnic groups: Yoruba, Igbo, Fulani, and Hausa, and the Igbo Information page from the Peoples Resources section of the site offers information about the ethnic group described in Things Fall Apart.

Ibo Culture in Things Fall Apart by Samantha Stevens tradition and its sanctity Week of Peace New Yam festival other ceremonies and kinship speech.

LBO Society Downfall Essay.

Things Fall Apart: Flaws in Ibo Society by Maggie Gunter on Prezi

In Things Fall Apart, a novel written by Chinua Achebe set during the colonization of Africa, the Ibo society and the main character, Okonkwo, had tragic flaws leading to their downfall - LBO Society Downfall Essay introduction. The tragic flaw of .

Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart - Women's Role in the Ibo Society Words | 5 Pages Women's Role in the Ibo Society In the novel Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, women of the Ibo tribe are terribly mistreated, and viewed as weak and receive little or no respect outside of their role as a mother.

In Things Fall Apart, the theme is the colonization of Africa by the British and the negative and violent changes this brought about in the lives of the African tribes. Along with colonization was the arrival of the missionaries whose main aim was to spread the message of Christianity and to convert people to their religion.

All of these kinds of things help make up the culture of a society.

Downfall of ibo society in things

In Things Fall Apart, which is set in Nigeria in the early s, Chinua Achebe describes Igbo culture, which encompasses.

Things Fall Apart: Flaws in Ibo Society by Maggie Gunter on Prezi